SBUBolivar, Missouri Est. 1878

Chemistry Major at Southwest Baptist University

Degree Requirements

Clubs & Organizations

Related Majors

Questions? Contact

John D. Patton
Department Chair
(417) 328-1662
jdpatton@sbuniv.edu

Visit the Department of Chemistry website for more information.

Pursue a science-related career.

SBU’s Chemistry major equips students with the skills necessary to flourish in their field. Many graduates are pursuing advanced degrees.

The SBU Advantage

  • We teach chemistry from a Christian perspective.
  • Small class sizes mean lots of hands-on help and interaction with professors.
  • Faculty care about student-learning and engage students at their level.

Special features

Pre-Health Programs SBU has a Pre-Health Careers Committee, consisting of faculty from the departments of biology and chemistry. This committee is dedicated to preparing and sending out those SBU students who wish to become physicians. The SBU Pre-Health Careers Committee provides a number of services to the pre-medical students.

Engaged Learning

Exciting and stimulating laboratory experiences aid in the learning process.

Course Information

The Bachelor of Arts chemistry major graduate is required to complete a concentration of 35 or more semester hours of chemistry coursework, including the core curriculum and the required support courses. The students obtaining the B.A. chemistry degree must also complete the University's language requirements for the degree. As additional graduation requirements, B. A. degree chemistry majors must take the Major Field Assessment Test (MFT) in chemistry and the departmental Chemistry Core Curriculum Assessment Test (ChemCAT) for graduation.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) major in chemistry must complete a concentration of 35 or more semester hours in chemistry coursework. In addition to the chemistry core curriculum and required support courses, B.S. chemistry majors are required to complete a minimum of six semester hours of upper division technical electives. Technical electives are considered to be courses taken from biology, computer science, mathematics, physical science, physics, and science and Christian faith. As additional graduation requirements, B.S. degree chemistry majors must take the Major Field Assessment Test (MFT) and the departmental Chemistry Core Curriculum Assessment Test (ChemCAT) for graduation.

Clubs and Organizations

Pre-Health Society is an open club for students who are interested in pursuing a career in a health-related field. The club meets once a month for group meetings, planning service events, and hearing guest speakers from various health fields. The club is a mix of all classes and gives younger students the chance to meet the older students who can encourage them in chosen fields and help them through the challenging parts of pursuing a career in a health field.

Scholarships

Bill Little Chemistry Scholarship — Chemistry student scholarship

Marie Colvin Scholarship — Pre-Med student scholarship

James Lightfoot Scholarship — Pre-Health/Pre-Med student scholarship

Friends of the College of Science and Mathematics Scholarship

Award recipients are selected by a committee of faculty members from the College of Science and Mathematics

Smith-Glynn-Callaway Medical Foundation Scholarship

The Smith-Glynn-Callaway Medical Foundation grants funds annually for students engaged in pre-medical endeavors. Recipients are selected annually by the SBU Pre-Health Careers Committee, with preference given to juniors and seniors with an overall average grade point average of 3.50 or higher.

Career Opportunities

A chemistry degree prepares students for graduate work in chemistry, for employment as chemists, for professional schools in the health sciences, for Unified Science Certification with endorsement in chemistry, or for other technical areas needing a strong chemistry/science background.

Degree Requirements

CHE 1115 General Chemistry I
A study of the fundamental laws and theories involved in chemical changes. Topics will include atomic theory, thermochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Stress will be on the solving of mathematical problems which illustrate the principles of chemistry. The course is designed principally for students planning on careers related to the natural sciences. Four lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 1125 General Chemistry II
A continuation of CHE 1115 covering chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, acid-base theory, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, the basics of coordination chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Four lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3304 Organic Chemistry I
Study of the theory and mechanisms of the basic reactions of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis on alkyl halides, alkanes, alkenes, stereochemistry, alicyclics, alkynes and dienes. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3314 Organic Chemistry II
Continuation of CHE 3304. Emphasis on aromatic compounds, interpretive spectroscopy, alcohols, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines and ethers. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3345 Analytical Chemistry
Study of the fundamental principles of quantitative analytical chemistry including basic statistics. An intensive laboratory experience which applies these principles to gravimetric, volumetric and electroanalytical determinations. Three lectures, two labs each week.
CHE 3354 Instrumental Analysis
Study of the basic principles of instrumental methods of analysis. Topics studied include optical methods, chromatographic methods and selected other modern methods. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3371 Seminar in Chemistry I
Presentation and discussion of modern developments in the field of chemistry. One session each week.
CHE 4471 Seminar in Chemistry II
Presentation and discussion of modern developments in the field of chemistry. One session each week.
MAT 1195 Analytics and Calculus I
This course studies graphs, functions, plane analytical geometry, limits, continuity, derivatives, velocity-acceleration, rates of change, maxima and minima, differentials, the Mean Value Theorems for integrals and derivatives, antiderivatives, definite integrals, area, and methods of finding volumes.
PHY 1115 General Physics I
A non-calculus physics course emphasizing the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-physical therapy, science education, biology, pre-medical, pre-veterinary, pre-optometry and pre-pharmacy majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.
SCF 3412 Chemistry Through the Eyes of Faith
Study from the biblical perspective of the unique nature of chemistry and its interaction with Christian thought. Working from the authority of the Scriptures and the conviction that Christianity is true, this course examines the history of chemistry, emphasizing the interactions of chemistry with society in religion, medicine and the environment.

One of the following sets of physics courses:

PHY 1115 General Physics I
A non-calculus physics course emphasizing the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-physical therapy, science education, biology, pre-medical, pre-veterinary, pre-optometry and pre-pharmacy majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.
PHY 1125 General Physics II
A non-calculus physics course emphasizing the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-physical therapy, science education, biology, pre-medical, pre-veterinary, pre-optometry and pre-pharmacy majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.
PHY 2215 University Physics I
A rigorous calculus-based physics course emphasizing mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-engineers, computer science and physical science majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period.
PHY 2225 University Physics II
A continuation of PHY 2215, emphasizing electricity, magnetism and optics; introduction to atomic physics. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.

Upper Division Chemistry Electives (chemistry majors are required to complete a minimum of six semester hours of upper division technical electives)

CHE 3002 Environmental Chemistry
The study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects and fates of chemical species in water, soil, air and living environments and the effects of technology thereon. Two lectures per week.
CHE 3324 Physical Chemistry I
Study of physicochemical systems, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria and solutions. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3334 Physical Chemistry II
Study of experimental and theoretical chemical kinetics, statistical mechanics, electrochemistry, molecular structure and quantum chemistry. Topics chosen to provide maximum benefit to the
CHE 3364 Biochemistry
A study of the chemistry and metabolism of biologically important compounds. Includes the biochemistry of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, nucleic acids and the energetics of living organisms. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 4002 Interpretive Spectroscopy
The study of the four main spectral techniques used for the identification of known organic compounds and for the determination of the structures of unknown organic compounds -- infrared spectroscopy (IR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (PMR), carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS). Two lectures per week.
CHE 4414 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Principles and theories of modern inorganic chemistry, including group theory, bonding, coordination chemistry and relationships of the periodic table. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
PHS 3303 History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
A study of the historical and philosophical foundations of science and technology, accompanied by an examination of the logical and ethical ramifications of various past and present science and technology phenomena.
PHY 3363 Modern Physics
A study of the atomic view of matter and radiation, relativity and wave-particle duality; basic concepts of quantum physics. Three lectures each week.
CHE 448 (1-3) Chemistry Research
Independent research investigations. May be repeated with consent of department. Lab fee $12-$36. Consent of department chair or research director required.
CHE 495(1-5) Special Topics in Chemistry
Topics of special interest not available to students in the traditional course offerings. Courses could include such topics as advanced organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, quantum chemistry, reaction kinetics and polymer chemistry. May be repeated as topics change.
CHE 499(1-3) Independent Study
Intensive individual study in areas of chemistry not usually covered in the normal curriculum. Prerequisites: Determined by the nature of topics studied. Consent of department chair required.